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The first part of our series can be found hereand be sure to check back next Friday for part three.

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Few will have heard of most of the women named, but they deserve to have their stories told. Barbara Clark. As a senior research analyst with foreign language capability, Mrs. Clark served in four different production elements as an analyst and reporter, briefer, manager, and special office-level assistant for manpower development.

Inshe returned to the line as a senior analyst and continued until her death in In addition to her cryptologic work, Mrs. Clark was best known for her efforts to help others. Blum Award for Excellence in the Employee Personal and Professional Arena in for her unsung and unselfish efforts to further the personal and professional goals of many people at NSA.

WIN also named its undergraduate scholarship fund, the Barbara W. Clark Scholarship Fund, in honor of her tremendous contributions to its scholarship efforts. Wilma Davis. After graduating from Bethany College with a degree in mathematics and teaching for four years, Wilma Zimmerman moved to Washington, D. She became interested in cryptology after reading a newspaper article about William and Elizebeth Friedman. She took a Navy correspondence course on cryptology and did quite well. She followed that with the Civil Service exams and was hired by William Friedman in or Within six months, her husband passed away.

Her first asment was with Italian diplomatic codes, which she worked untilwhen she was transferred to the Japanese problem. Within two years, Mrs. Davis was the head of the department responsible for solving and processing all addresses on all intercepted Japanese army code messages.

InWilma married again and moved to Canada, leaving the cryptologic field. Unfortunately, her second husband died in William Friedman sent her a telegram and asked her to return to work again on Venona. She readily accepted. Before the decade ended, she remarried again. She returned to work on codebreaking during the Vietnam War, finally retiring in Agnes Meyer Driscoll. She ed the U. Married inMrs. Driscoll continued as a civilian with the Navy. Her efforts were rewarded with a promotion and raise in Valuable information garnered from reading the Japanese Red Book included general knowledge of naval maneuvers and advances in naval aviation.

Inthe Japanese complicated the system, but Mrs. Driscoll solved it as well. Information learned from this new system came during the Japanese Grand Maneuvers. The Japanese exercise simulated combat operations against the United States. The decrypts indicated that the Japanese knew, quite accurately, American operational plans. This revelation secured als intelligence importance within the Navy. With 85, code groups and daily changes in the key, this task was assisted by the new IBM tabulating machines.

The analytic work was done by the naval cryptanalysts, but the machines facilitated tracking of the codes and cipher. Driscoll made the first break, an accomplishment unequaled at the time and not repeated until the U. Army broke Purple nearly a decade later. Based on the information learned, the U. She also worked briefly in with Edward Hebern at his laboratory in California, improving his des for cipher machines. Although Mrs. Agnes Driscoll retired from NSA in Genevieve Grotjan Feinstein.

Genevieve Grotjan attended the University of Buffalo, hoping to become a math teacher. With no teaching positions available during the Great Depression, she took a job as a statistical clerk with the Railroad Retirement Board in Washington, D.

InMiss Grotjan was a member of a team of cryptanalysts involved in the decryption and reading of Japanese secret messages. The team struggled for eighteen months with this difficult Japanese diplomatic cipher, codenamed Purple. In SeptemberGenevieve Grotjan made a discovery that changed the course of history. By analyzing and studying the intercepted encrypted messages, she found a correlation that no one else had yet detected.

Her successful breakthrough enabled other cryptanalysts to find other links. SIS built a Purple analog machine to decrypt the Japanese diplomatic messages.

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Genevieve Grotjan followed her success with work on other Japanese ciphers systems. Once again she identified ly unnoticed characteristics in the messages that contributed ificantly to successful exploitation. Elizebeth Friedman. Elizebeth Smith, an English literature graduate of Hillsdale College in Michigan, began her cryptologic career in at Riverbank Laboratory, a research lab outside Chicago. Her task was to assist in the decryption of the works of Shakespeare. A relatively well-known theory at the time stated that Francis Bacon authored the works of Shakespeare.

It was believed he used his biliteral cipher in the original folios and, with careful analysis, it could be proven. Miss Smith worked under the direction of Elizabeth Gallup, who had written a book in on the subject and claimed she had deciphered some of the work. The biliteral system used slight changes in font to distinguish the cipher letter from the plain text. Team members analyzed the fonts and indicated which were believed to be cipher.

Miss Smith was then expected to determine the decipherment. Only able to decipher a word or two, Elizebeth took the work to Mrs. Gallup who, with relative ease, translated complete sentences. Confused, Elizebeth reexamined the font selections. Eventually she came to doubt Mrs. Following years of study, Elizebeth and her husband, William Friedman, would write a book refuting the notion that a cipher was contained in the works of Shakespeare.

InMrs. Friedman moved with her husband to Washington, D. However, her skill as a cryptanalyst following World War I proved invaluable to the United States during the Prohibition years. She almost single-handedly broke over 12, coded messages from the rumrunners and smugglers who used codes to conduct their illicit business. Her efforts, and her testimony at their trials, broke up smuggling rings and saved the government hundreds of thousands of dollars. Days later the Coast Guard sank the ship in international waters while it was flying the Canadian flag.

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The U. Friedman was able to prove the U. Friedman created the communications security systems for the International Monetary Fund. Admission and parking are free! for hours, directions, and other information. You can also follow the museum on Facebook. News March 13, Wilma Davis passed away in December Genevieve Grotjan, by now Genevieve Feinstein, left the cryptologic business in Elizebeth Friedman Elizebeth Smith, an English literature graduate of Hillsdale College in Michigan, began her cryptologic career in at Riverbank Laboratory, a research lab outside Chicago.

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How the American Women Codebreakers of WWII Helped Win the War